Evolution of survival and risk of relapse in Burkitt and young Hodgkin lymphoma patients

Lasse Hjort Jakobsen | Huhti 2019 | |

Lasse Hjort Jakobsen
Statistician, postdoc,
Department of Hematology,
Aalborg University Hospital,
Department of Clinical Medicine,
Aalborg University

Jorne Lionel Biccler
Statistician, ph.d.-student,
Department of Hematology,
Aalborg University Hospital,
Department of Clinical Medicine,
Aalborg University

While most attendees of the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology are clinicians, there is plenty of room for other scientific groups. We, two statisticians, presented our research projects at the annual conference at two separate oral sessions. Both sessions were well attended (one can only speculate in crowd size) and useful questions were raised. The aims of the two studies were similar, namely providing updated information on the relapse risk and the loss in life expectancy at different mile- stones during the patient follow-up period. In the study presented by Lasse Hjort Jakobsen, these questions were investigated for Burkitt lymphoma patients treated with intensive immunochemo- therapy.1 Jorne Lionel Biccler presented this information for young classical Hodgkin lymphoma patients.2 The Burkitt lymphoma study was based on registers from Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Australia and included a total of 159 adult patients with a classical Burkitt histology (including FISH-detectable MYC translocation). The median age was 48 and most patients presented with advanced stage disease (75%), elevated LDH (75%), and extra nodal involvement (83%). The administered chemo- therapy protocols were CHOEP (2%), DA-EPOCH (13%), HYPER-CVAD (26%), CODOX-M/IVAC (28%), BFM or GMALL (31%), and others (1%), which led to an overall remission rate of 88%. It was demonstrated that from diagnosis, the survival of the patents was inferior to that of a general population matched on age, sex, and country. This was also the case for patients in complete remission. However, for patients remaining in remission for one year, the survival was similar to that of the general population. Furthermore, the five-year relapse risk measured from time of response evaluation was 6%, but among patients in remission for one year, no relapses were observed. The Hodgkin lymphoma study relied on data extracted from the population-based registers from Denmark, Norway, and Sweden....